PAN Amsterdam attracted 10,000 visitors during the opening weekend

11/17/2017

20112017PAN Amsterdam ontvangt 10.000 bezoekers in bruisend openingsweekend   Alternate Text

Amsterdam 20 November 2017. PAN Amsterdam attracted 10,000 visitors during the opening weekend. The exciting start to the fair for art antiques and design won praise from visitors and exhibitors alike. The strength of the Dutch economy was reflected in the encouraging sales, and the atmosphere at the fair is excellent. Galerie Vivid (stand 35) sold Museum Voorlinden in Wassenaar a wheelbarrow by Gerrit Rietveld, designed in 1920 and made in 1970. Galerie Rob Koudijs (stand 124) reported several sales to Museum Coda in Apeldoorn and sold a bracelet by Gijs Bakker to an American collector. Many young buyers also came to the fair. Rademakers Gallery (stand 3) reported a remarkable number of sales to young buyers, including the Banana Global Mobile that Studio Job made especially for PAN Amsterdam.

 

Some remarkable sales were made in the first hours of the fair. This year, in addition to a number of works by glass painters, Etienne Gallery (stand 141) showed paintings by the identical twins Fabrizus2 (1981, Kazakhstan) and sold all four of them. The superb clock by the Amsterdam-based clockmaker François de Mey (1642-1695) offered by Mentink & Roest (stand 106) found a new home with a private collector. The asking price for the clock with floral and mythological motifs was € 325,000. De Galerie van Piet Hein Eek (stand 85) sold the tile chest, which he made with his wife, along with various other objects. The painting ‘Still Life with Roses in a Vase’ by Margaretha Roosenboom (1843-1896), which had come on to the market for the first time in a century at Kunsthandel A.H. Bies (stand 43), found a new owner on Sunday afternoon.

 

Robert Schreuder Antiquair (stand 45) sold ‘A Pair of Lions after Canova’. These exceptionally high-quality late eighteen-century figures in biscuit-fired porcelain made by Giovanni Trevisan, also called Giovanni Volpato, had an asking price of €20,000. E. Pranger Oriental Art (stand 140) also sold several items, including a rare wine vase from the Song Dynasty (twelfth century) to a private collector. This year netsukes, small Japanese carvings, proved to be extremely popular and Algemeene Ethnografica en Kunsthandel Aalderink (stand 29) reported several sales. ‘We are delighted; it was a fantastic opening and we sold above expectations in all areas,’ said John Endlich Antiquairs (stand 27).

 

Dealers from abroad also did good business. Dep Art (stand144) from Milan reported good sales during the opening including a number of three-dimensional paintings by the young artist Pino Deadato. ‘Due Grigi’ of 1972 by Carla Accardi was sold by Kanalidarte (stand14) from Brescia. Hidde van Seggelen (stand 40) from Hamburg sold work by Andy Holden and Lutz Driessen to private collectors.

 

Photography sold extremely well during the opening weekend. Kahmann Gallery (stand 28) sold several photographs by Bastian Woudt and Casper Faasen. Eduard Planting Gallery | Fine Arts Photography (stand 131) sold a portrait of Corine Rottschäfer (Miss World in 1959) by Paul Huf and two portraits of Brigitte Bardot taken by Terry O’Neill with asking prices of €22,500 and €6,950.

 

Dutch design is an important field at PAN Amsterdam. Galerie VAN DEN BRUINHORST (stand 5) sold two lamps by Gispen, one of them the Giso Z wall lamp made in 1951. The gallery also sold a museum quality standard lamp made by Beckowitz in 1930 to a private collector. Steltman Juwelier (stand 47) made a collection of jade ornaments to celebrate its hundredth anniversary and sold a yellow gold ring with an openwork lotus flower on a mirrored surface on the first day.

 

Newcomer to the fair Dürst Britt & Mayhew (stand 42) also had a good first weekend. They sold work by Paul Beumer to the collection of the Amsterdam Medical Centre. De Rijk Fine Art (stand 154) sold various works by the German conceptual artist Klaus Staudt (D. 1932). New to the Dutch market, they are showing work by Keisuke Matsuura (1971). ‘JIBA – PW – 1’, made with magnets and iron filings, was sold to a private collector.

 

A Word of Thanks
PAN Amsterdam would like to thank its lead sponsor Oyens & Van Eeghen and sponsors Paardekooper, Laurent-Perrier and the Prins Bernard Cultuurfonds for their generous support.