Van der Vorst - Art

La Femme au Collier

description

Pablo Picasso

Medium
Original chalk-drawn lithograph in black ink, on Arches paper (with Arches watermark).

Edition
Annotated ‘Epreuve D’etat’ one of only 5 proofs reserved for the artist next to the numbered edition of 50. Dated ’29.3.1947’ in reverse in the stone.
Drawn and printed at the Atelier Mourlot, Paris, March 1947 
Edition issued by Galerie Leiris, Paris, 1947

Dimensions
Sheet size: 65.5 x 49.8 cm 
Frame size: 101.0 x 86.0 cm

Signature & numbering
Signed in pencil (Lower left)
Annotated ‘Epreuve D’etat’ (Lower left)

Catalogue raisonné
- G. Bloch, Picasso, L'oeuvre gravé and lithographié, n° 438 
- F. Mourlot, Picasso Lithographe, n° 84
- Güse- Rau, Picasso lithographe no. 183

Condition
In superb condition with very strong inking and still showing the faint traces of Picasso’s first sketched ideas. On pale cream Arches paper. Surface excellent. With the full, untrimmed deckled edges. Drawn virtually to the full sheet size, as issued.

Provenance
From an important Parisian private collection.

Frame
Framed, free floating, to museum standards in a handmade wooden frame with white gold and 99% uv- resistant museum glass.

Provenance

From an important Parisian private collection.

Literature

- G. Bloch, Picasso, L'oeuvre gravé and lithographié, n° 438
- F. Mourlot, Picasso Lithographe, n° 84
- Güse- Rau, Picasso lithographe no. 183

Detail Description

Pablo Picasso- La Femme au Collier Portrait of Françoise, 1947



In March 1947 Picasso’s relationship with Françoise Gilot was at a peak of domestic happiness and calm. It was also a moment when he was almost totally immersed in his passion for the medium of lithography and his work at Fernand Mourlot’s Paris studio.



It was a period that inspired some of Picasso’s most beautiful prints, including two studies of Françoise which he executed in just a very expressive and simple flowing chalk-drawn line.

The first ‘Profile’ was drawn on March 26th and then the full face ‘La Femme au Collier’ here, created in a single session three days later.



The flow of the lines of her long hair, drawn in just two strokes, plays against the oval of her face and the contrasting pattern in the linking of the beads of the necklace and geometric pattern on the neckline of her dress. It is so beautifully expressive of Picasso’s feelings and without any emotional complications.

In the background of ‘La Femme au Collier’ there remains some very faint suggestions that Picasso tried out adding some elaborations to the study but then erased them perhaps feeling that they would detract from the almost hypnotic purity of the image.



 

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La Femme au Collier

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